NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults - page 11

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NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults
Version 2013
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Part 1: But I’m too young to have cancer!
Why?
One reason is that younger people go to the doctor less
often than people older than age 40, so early signs of
cancer are more likely to be missed. Teens and young
adults who have no or minimum health insurance are
unlikely get regular health tests that might detect cancer
before it has spread.
Young adults also develop different types of cancer than
older adults (Table 1). Lymphomas, for example, are the
most common cancers in people who are 15 to 24 years
old, but are less common as people get older. In addition,
the cancers young people do develop often have different
mutations and behave very differently than the same
cancers in children and older patients. For example:
Table 1. Top cancers by age group
15 to 19
20 to 24
25 to 29
30 to 34
35 to 39
40 +
Lymphomas
Lymphomas
Thyroid cancer
Breast cancer
Breast cancer
Prostate cancer
Leukemias
Germ cell
Lymphomas
Thyroid cancer
Thyroid cancer
Breast cancer
Germ cell
Thyroid cancer
Germ cell
Melanoma
Melanoma
Colorectal cancer
Central nervous
system (CNS)
Melanoma
Melanoma
Lymphomas
Cervical & uterine
cancer
Lung cancer
Thyroid cancer
Leukemias
Breast cancer
Germ cell
Lymphomas
Bladder cancer
Bone sarcomas CNS
Cervical & uterine
cancer
Cervical & uterine
cancer
Colorectal cancer Lymphomas
Melanoma
Soft tissue
sarcomas
CNS
Colorectal cancer Germ cell
Melanoma
Soft tissue
sarcomas
Bone sarcomas Leukemias
Soft tissue
sarcomas
Soft tissue
sarcomas
Ovarian cancer
Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Soft tissue
sarcomas
Leukemias
Leukemias
Kidney cancer
1...,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,...120
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