NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults - page 112

112
NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults
Version 2013
Part 11: A cancer dictionary
Medical oncologist
A doctor who’s an expert in treating
cancer with drugs.
Melanoma
A cancer of the cells that give skin its
brownish color.
Menopause
Twelve or more months without
experiencing a menstrual period.
Monocyte
A type of white blood cell.
Mucus membrane
A thin layer of cells that line passages
and open spaces inside the body
and produce a slick substance called
mucus that keeps the membranes
moist and helps protect against
infection.
Needle biopsy
Insertion of a needle into a tumor to
remove tissue for testing.
Neutrophil
A type of white blood cell.
Normal range
A set of values that doctors use when
evaluating patients’ test results that is
based on the results seen in 95% of
healthy individuals.
Oncofertility
A team approach when cancer doctors
and reproductive specialists work
together to preserve fertility in cancer
patients.
Oncologist
A doctor who specializes in treating
cancer.
Osteoporosis
A disease causing thinning, weakened
bones.
Ovaries
The pair of female organs that make
eggs and hormones.
Pathologist
A doctor who’s an expert in testing
cells and tissue to find disease.
Platelet
A type of blood cell that forms blood
clots to control bleeding.
Positron emission tomography
(PET)
A test that uses radioactive material to
see the function of organs and tissues
inside the body.
Radiation field
In radiation therapy, the area(s) of the
body targeted with beams of radiation.
Radiation therapy
Use of high-energy rays to destroy
cancer cells.
Radiologist
A doctor who’s an expert in reading
imaging tests.
Radiopharmaceutical
A drug that contains a radioactive
substance.
Red blood cell
A type of blood cell that carries oxygen
from the lungs to all parts of the body.
Reproductive system
The organs and tissues involved in
the process of pregnancy and child
bearing—the vagina, cervix, uterus,
fallopian tubes, and ovaries in women,
and the penis, testicles, and prostate in
men.
Sarcomas
A group of cancers that develop in the
bone or soft tissues of the cartilage,
fat, muscle, blood vessels, and other
connective or supportive tissue.
Secondary cancers
Cancers that develop as a result of
damage caused by the treatment of
the original cancer.
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