NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults - page 29

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NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults
Version 2013
Part 3: Preparing for the future
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Your doctor should discuss fertility issues with you before beginning cancer
treatment. The questions below can serve as a guideline to help you fill in any
gaps as you talk with your doctor.
Will the treatment you are recommending affect my ability to
have children?
If so, what is your best estimate for the chance I will become infertile
due to cancer therapy?
Are there other ways to treat this cancer that will not affect my fertility?
Is there anything that can be done during treatment to protect my fertility?
How long would it be safe to delay the start of my treatment, if I wanted
to consider fertility preservation?
Is there anything I can do after treatment to preserve my fertility?
How will I know if I am fertile when treatment is over? Are there tests that
I can take?
For women: After my treatments are over, how long will it take for my
periods to begin again? If I am not having periods, should I still use
contraceptives?
For women: Is pregnancy safe for me after treatment? If so, how long
should I wait after treatment to become pregnant?
Does this hospital have an oncofertility team?
If not, where can I find support for coping with fertility issues?
Can you refer me to a specialist who can help preserve my fertility?
Questions to ask your doctor about:
Fertility
Definitions
Alkylating agents:
Drugs
that damage instructions in
cancer cells so they can’t
grow and multiply
GI tract:
Group of organs
eaten food passes through
Hair follicles:
Tube-like
openings in the skin where
hairs develop and grow
Menopause:
Twelve or
more months without a
menstrual period
Mucus membrane:
Layer
of cells that moistens and
lines surfaces in the body
Ovaries:
Pair of female
organs that make eggs and
hormones
Sperm:
Male reproductive
cells formed in the testicles
Stem cell transplant:
Replacing damaged
immature blood-forming
cells called stem cells with
healthy cells
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