NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Breast Cancer - page 11

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NCCN Guidelines for Patients™: Breast Cancer
Version 2.2011
Definitions:
Axillary:
On the side of
the body near the armpit
Carcinoma in situ:
Breast
cancer that has not spread
beyond the ducts or lobules
Hormone replacement
therapy:
Medicine to
increase hormone levels
Internal mammary:
Below
the breastbone
Menopause:
The end of
menstrual periods
Menstrual periods
: The
flow of blood and tissue
from the uterus
Radiotherapy:
Treatment
with radiation
Risk factors
: Something
that increases the chance
of getting a disease
Supraclavicular:
Near the
collarbone
Tumor:
A mass made from
an abnormal growth of cells
Uterus:
The female organ
where babies grow during
pregnancy; the womb
Part 2: About my cancer
2.4 Common types of breast cancer
Common types of breast cancer are broadly grouped by whether the cancer is
limited to or has grown beyond the ducts or lobules. Breast cancer confined to the
ducts or lobules is called “noninvasive” or “carcinoma in situ.” Breast cancer that has
spread beyond the walls of the ducts or lobules is called “infiltrating” or “invasive.” A
single breast tumor often has areas with both of these cancer types. In other words,
the tumor is a mix of noninvasive and invasive cancer.
Carcinoma in situ
Carcinoma is another word for cancer. Carcinoma in situ means that the cancer is
still confined to the ducts or lobules where it started. It has not spread into nearby
fatty tissues of the breast or to other organs. There are two kinds of breast
carcinoma in situ:
Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)
. Also called lobular neoplasia, LCIS is cancer
restricted to the lobules. Breast cancer doctors do not think that LCIS becomes an
invasive cancer. However, women with LCIS are at higher risk of having invasive
cancer in either breast.
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).
This is the most common kind of carcinoma
in situ. In DCIS, cancer cells are only in the ductal walls. Doctors treat DCIS with
surgery and sometimes radiotherapy, which usually cures the cancer. If DCIS is not
treated, it will likely grow into an invasive cancer.
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