NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - page 48

48
NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Version 1.2014
Part 6: Overview of cancer treatments
Using the scans, your treatment team will plan the best
radiation dose, number and shape of radiation beams,
and number of treatment sessions. Beams are shaped
with computer software and hardware added to the
radiation machine. Radiation beams are aimed at the
tumor with help from ink marks on the skin or marker
seeds in the tumor.
During treatment, you will lie on a table in the same
position as done for simulation. Devices may be used
to keep you from moving. You will be alone while the
technician operates the machine from a nearby room.
He or she will be able to see, hear, and speak with you.
As treatment is given, you may hear noises. One session
takes less than 10 minutes. The types of EBRT include:
• 3D-CRT (three-
d
imensional
c
onformal
r
adiation
t
herapy) – Treatment is completed in about 6 weeks
and uses photon beams that match the shape of the
tumor,
• IMRT (
i
ntensity-
m
odulated
r
adiation
t
herapy) –
Treatment is completed in about 6 weeks and uses
photon beams of different strengths based on the
thickness of the tumor,
• SABR (
s
tereotactic
ab
lative
r
adiotherapy) –
Treatment is completed in 1 to 2 weeks and uses
precise, high-dose photon beams,
• Hadron therapy – Treatment is completed in about
6 weeks and uses proton beams that deliver
radiation mostly within the tumor,
• SRS (
s
tereotactic
r
adio
s
urgery) – Treatment is
completed in 1 to 2 weeks and uses precise,
high-dose photon beams to treat brain tumors, and
• WBRT (
w
hole
b
rain
r
adiation
t
herapy) – Treatment
is completed in 2 weeks and uses small amounts of
radiation to treat the entire brain.
A lung tumor is harder to target than some other tumors
in the body. This is because breathing causes the tumor
to move. IGRT (
i
mage-
g
uided
r
adiation
t
herapy) can
improve how well the radiation beam targets the tumor.
IGRT uses a machine that delivers radiation and also
takes pictures of the tumor. Pictures can be taken right
before or during treatment. These pictures are compared
to the ones taken during simulation. If needed, changes
will be made to your body position or the radiation
beams.
Side effects of radiation
The most common side effects of radiation therapy
are changes in skin. Your treated skin will look and feel
as if it has been sunburned. It will likely become red
and may also become dry, sore, and feel painful when
touched. You may also have hair loss. Other side effects
of radiation include swelling of the lungs or esophagus,
extreme tiredness despite sleep, and loss of appetite.
Not all side effects of radiation are listed here. Please
ask your treatment team for a complete list of common
and rare side effects. If a side effect bothers you, tell
your treatment team. There may be ways to help you
feel better.
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