NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Ovarian Cancer - page 15

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Part 2: Initial tests for ovarian cancer
NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Ovarian cancer
Version 1.2013
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Definitions:
Abdomen:
The belly area
between the chest and
pelvis
Fallopian tubes:
The
female organ that eggs
travel through from an
ovary (organ that makes
eggs and hormones) to
the uterus (where a baby
grows during pregnancy)
GI tract:
Group of organs
that food passes through
when you eat
Radiologist:
A doctor
who’s an expert in reading
imaging tests
Sedative:
A drug that helps
a person to relax or go to
sleep
Side effect:
An unplanned
physical or emotional
response to treatment
Scans
Scanning machines are large and have a tunnel in the middle. During the test,
you will lie on a table that moves slowly through the tunnel as the machine takes
many pictures. Then a computer combines all pictures into one detailed picture.
Imaging scans can take 15 to 60 minutes to complete.
Often, there are no side effects. You will likely be able to resume your activities
right away unless you took a sedative. You may not get the results for a few
days since a radiologist needs to see the pictures. There are many different
types of scans. Examples of scans used for ovarian cancer include CT
(
c
omputed
t
omography), MRI (
m
agnetic
r
esonance
i
maging), and PET
(
p
ositron
e
mission
t
omography). These scans are described next.
Figure 4. Ultrasounds for ovarian cancer
Illustration Copyright © 2013 Nucleus Medical Media, All rights reserved.
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