NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Ovarian Cancer - page 37

37
Part 4: Treatment with surgery
NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Ovarian cancer
Version 1.2013
Par t 1
Par t 2
Par t 3
Par t 4
Par t 5
Par t 6
Par t 7
Par t 8
Par t 9
Par t 10
Definitions:
Biopsy:
Removal of small
amounts of tissue or fluid
to be tested for disease
Chemotherapy:
Drugs
that kill all cells that grow
rapidly, including normal
cells and cancer cells
Completion surgery:
Surgery that removes
the remaining ovary (or
ovaries), Fallopian tube(s),
and uterus, and possibly
the omentum, nearby
supporting tissue, and any
remaining cancer
Invasive implant:
Cancer
cells that have broken
away from the first tumor
and have invaded (grown
into) supporting tissues of
another organ or structure
!
For more details, see
page 22 for staging,
29 for surgery, and
41 for chemotherapy.
Borderline ovarian cancer
Staging and surgery
Results from prior surgery or biopsy
Staging
complete
Staging not
complete
Invasive implants
No invasive implants
Surgical treatment and staging
Remove one ovary and its Fallopian
tube + surgical staging,
Start follow-up
Surgical treatment and staging
+ adjuvant chemotherapy
Start follow-up, or
Surgical treatment + adjuvant
chemotherapy
Start follow-up, or
No invasive
implants
Invasive
implants
Want to
have babies
Remove one ovary and its Fallopian
tube + surgical staging
Start follow-up, or
Completion surgery
Surgical treatment and staging
+ adjuvant chemotherapy
Start follow-up, or
No invasive
implants
Invasive
implants
Don’t want to
have babies
Completion surgery
Start follow-up, or
The chart above describes the recommended surgical treatment and staging
procedures for borderline ovarian cancer. Borderline ovarian cancer is often found by
accident during surgery or testing for an unrelated health condition. Borderline ovarian
cancer may also be found because of its symptoms. (See page 11 for symptom details.)
1...,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36 38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,...100
Powered by FlippingBook