NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Ovarian Cancer - page 42

42
Part 5: Treatment with cancer drugs
NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
: Ovarian cancer
Version 1.2013
The chemotherapy drugs used for ovarian cancer are:
Recommended primary chemotherapy regimens
Stage
Drug
Route given
Stage I
Carboplatin with paclitaxel or docetaxel
Injection in a vein (IV)
Stage II, III, IV Paclitaxel with cisplatin
Injection in the abdomen (IP)
Paclitaxel with carboplatin
Injection in a vein (IV)
Docetaxel with carboplatin
Injection in a vein (IV)
Dose-dense paclitaxel with carboplatin
Injection in a vein (IV)
Other regimens
Stage
Drug
Route given
Stage II, III, IV Bevacizumab with paclitaxel and carboplatin
Injection into a vein (IV)
The chart above lists the chemotherapy drug regimens
used to treat ovarian cancer. Chemotherapy for ovarian
cancer can be given as a liquid that is slowly injected
into a vein or your abdomen. When it is injected into
a vein, it is called IV (
i
ntra
v
enous) chemotherapy.
When it is injected into your abdomen, it is called IP
(
i
ntra
p
eritoneal) chemotherapy. IV chemotherapy
is a type of systemic treatment, which travels through
the bloodstream to treat cancer throughout your
body. Neoadjuvant treatment is almost always
IV chemotherapy. IP chemotherapy is a type of regional
treatment and delivers higher doses of the drugs directly
to the cancer. IP chemotherapy is given through a thin,
flexible tube called a catheter that is placed inside the
abdomen (peritoneal cavity) during surgery.
Chemotherapy injections are often given as outpatient
treatment at a hospital, clinic, or doctor’s office.
The length of the outpatient visit depends on
which chemotherapy drugs you receive.
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