NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Stages I and II Breast Cancer - page 37

NCCN Guidelines for Patients
®
Stages I and II Breast Cancer, Version 1.2014
35
4
Chemotherapy/HER2 inhibitors Should I have adjuvant chemotherapy?
Should I have adjuvant
chemotherapy?
Deciding factors
Lower-risk breast cancer
Tubular and mucinous breast cancers are rare
subtypes of invasive ductal carcinoma. Tubular
breast cancer is so named because the cancer cells
look like tubes. Mucinous (or colloid) breast cancer
is so named because there’s a lot of mucus around
the cancer cells. Both tubular and mucinous breast
cancers tend to grow slowly and not spread outside
the breast. The recommendations for tubular and
mucinous breast cancers are listed below.
Lower-risk breast cancer
| Hormone receptor-positive
Size of breast tumor
Size of lymph node tumor
Do I need chemotherapy?
0.5 cm or smaller
None or tiny (≤2.0 mm) tumors No
1.0 to 2.9 cm
None or tiny (≤2.0 mm) tumors No
3.0 cm or larger
None or tiny (≤2.0 mm) tumors No
Any size
Larger than 2.0 mm
Consider chemotherapy
Almost all tubular and mucinous breast cancers are
both hormone receptor–positive and HER2-negative.
In fact, testing should be repeated if test results
show your tumor is hormone receptor–negative or
HER2-positive. Should the second tests find the
same results, the tubular or mucinous breast cancer
should be treated according to the recommendations
for higher-risk breast cancers. When the cancer is
hormone receptor–positive, chemotherapy should be
considered when there is at least one tumor in your
axillary lymph nodes that is 2.0 mm or larger.
1...,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36 38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,...96
Powered by FlippingBook