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MEDIA ADVISORY: Cancer Care in an Election Year and Incorporating Patient Values Among Highlights at NCCN Annual Conference, March 31–April 2, 2016

MEDIA ADVISORY

Cancer Care in an Election Year and Incorporating Patient Values Among Highlights at NCCN Annual Conference, March 31–April 2, 2016

 

What: The influence of election year politics on cancer care, the safe use of opioids in pain management, and ways to elicit and incorporate patient values into cancer care are among the topics to be addressed at the NCCN 21st Annual Conference:Advancing the Standard of Cancer CareMore than 1,700 of the nation’s leaders in oncology are expected to gather to discuss updates in cancer treatment and issues of broad interest to patients, oncologists, nurses, pharmacists, and health care professionals who care for patients with cancer.

A full conference agenda is here

 

When: Thursday, March 31–Saturday April 2, 2016 

 

Where: The Diplomat, Hollywood, FL 33019

 

Selected Sessions:

  • Emerging Issues in Oncology: Cancer Care in an Election Year (Roundtable)

Four panelists from both sides of the aisle — including a presidential campaign’s policy advisor and one of the major architects of the Affordable Care Act — will come together to discuss issues surrounding cancer and health care in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. April 1, 8–9:30 am ET.

  • Palliative Care: Providing Comfort from a Patient and Provider Perspective (Roundtable)
  • The NCCN Value Initiative: Using NCCN Evidence Blocks in Clinical Decisions
  • Understanding and Utilizing Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions
  • Controversies in Breast Cancer Screening Strategies
  • Cancer Pain Management: Strategies for Safe and Effective Opioid Prescribing
  • Sexual Function in Cancer Survivors: Updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship

 

Members of the media are invited to attend in person. To register, contact Katie Kiley Brown at brown@nccn.org.

 

Who:  The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is a not-for-profit alliance of 26 of the nation’s leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research and education. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at its Member Institutions, NCCN develops continually updated guidelines that set the standard of care for patients, clinicians, payers, and other health care decision-makers in the U.S. and abroad.

 

Visit our online newsroom at NCCN.org/news.

 

Contact: 

Katie Kiley Brown, NCCN Communications Manager            

(215) 690-0238

brown@nccn.org

 

Background on Topics of Interest:

1. Cancer Care in an Election Year

Four panelists and two moderators from both sides of the aisle — including a presidenial campaign’s policy advisor and one of the major architects of the Affordable Care Act — will discuss the issues surrounding cancer and health care in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. Among the considerations: what are the candidates’ stances on health care, and how will cancer fit into the health agenda? What is the future impact on President Obama’s “moonshot” initiative to eliminate cancer? Panelists will explore the fundamental differences that drive the two parties’ health care positions and the policies that guide how cancer care is provided and reimbursed.

  •  Session:            
    Emerging Issues in Oncology: Cancer Care in an Election Year, Friday, April 1, 8–9:30 a.m.

 

  • Speakers:          
    Moderators
    Kavita Patel, MD, MSHS, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
    Marc Samuels, JD, MPH, Founder & CEO, ADVI

    Panelists
    Cybele Bjorklund, MHS, Distinguished Visitor/Senior Fellow, Georgetown University
    Lanhee J. Chen, PhD, David and Diane Steffy Research Fellow, Hoover Institution
    Elizabeth J. Fowler, PhD, JD, Vice President, Global Health Policy, Johnson & Johnson
    Scott Gottlieb, MD, Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
     

2. Value and Patient Preference in Cancer Care

There is no “one size fits all” approach to cancer care: a younger patient might want the most effective treatment despite the side effects, while an older patient might be more concerned with toxicity and side effects. Other patients might be more concerned about affordability. While physicians agree that a patient’s values should always be included in the decision-making process, the best way to communicate with patients regarding their preferences is not always clear. One tool at their disposal is the new NCCN Evidence Blocks, a graphic representation of five value measures including efficacy, safety, quality and quantity of evidence, consistency of evidence, and affordability. Speakers will discuss how clinicians can ensure their patients’ values are being integrated into the decision-making process so that they get the treatment that is right for them.

  • Sessions: 

 The NCCN Value Initiative: Using NCCN  Evidence Blocks in Clinical Decisions

 Thursday, March 31, 2:25–3:25 p.m.

 

Understanding and Utilizing Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions

Friday, April 1, 1:15–2:15 p.m.

 

  • Speaker(s):

 Robert W. Carlson, MD, Chief Executive  Officer, NCCN

 Eric Jonasch, MD, The University of Texas 
 MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

 Peter A. Ubel, MD, Duke Cancer Institute

 

3.  Issues in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer

Two sessions will tackle what’s new in the world of breast cancer, from novel treatment agents to the heated public debate over breast cancer screening recommendations.

NCCN Guidelines Update: Breast Cancer

Precision medicine is playing more of a role in breast cancer treatment, with doctors using combinations of new and existing therapies to tailor treatments to individual patients. Some recommendations have evolved, such as how to manage patients with HER2- and hormone-receptor-positive disease, while other recommendations remain the same despite growing bodies of evidence, such as the approach to patients with triple-negative breast cancer. The speakers will discuss what has changed, what hasn’t, and why — and how this information impacts patients.

Controversies in Breast Cancer Screening

At what age should a woman begin mammography and how often should she screen? These may be simple questions, but the answers are complicated. Recommendations are at odds, with major players including NCCN, the American Cancer Society, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force all taking different positions. As these groups work toward creating a consensus document that reveals where they mutually agree, hear about the perspectives that underlie the various recommendations, and what is likely to emerge.  

  • Sessions:

 NCCN Guidelines Update: Breast Cancer

 Friday, April 1, 11 a.m.–noon

Controversies in Breast Cancer Screening Strategies

Saturday, April 2, 11 a.m.–noon

 

  • Speakers:

 William Gradishar, MD, Robert H. Lurie  Comprehensive Cancer
 Center of Northwestern University

 Kilian Salerno, MD, Roswell Park Cancer
 Institute

 

 Facilitator: 
 Mary Lou Smith, JD, MBA, Research
 Advocacy Network 

 Speakers:  
 Therese Bevers, MD, The University of Texas
 MD Anderson Cancer Center

 Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, MD, PhD, MAS, 
 University of California, San Francisco

 Kevin Oeffinger, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering
 Cancer Center

 

4. Pain Management and Substance Abuse Risk

As the opioid abuse epidemic escalates, where do patients with cancer — the majority of whom experience pain — fit in? How can providers safely manage patients’ pain while preventing and treating medication abuse or misuse? What are the warning signs of opioid abuse, and how can clinicians screen patients for risk factors before pain treatment begins? At a time when substance abuse and chronic pain are major public health concerns, the speaker argues that clinicians must be smart enough to treat both.

  • Session:
    Cancer Pain Management: Strategies for Safe and Effective Opioid Prescribing

           Saturday, April 2, 12:45 – 1:45 p.m.

  • Speaker:          
    Judith Paice, PhD, RN, FAAN, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer
    Center of Northwestern University

 

5. Other sessions of interest:

Sexual Function in Cancer Survivors: Updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship

Thursday, March 31, 1:15–2:15 p.m.

  • Speakers:
    Michelle Melisko, MD, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
    Joseph Narus, DNP, APRN, NP, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

 

Palliative Care: Providing Comfort from a Patient and Provider Perspective

Friday, April 1, 11 a.m.–noon

  • Speakers: 
    Moderator
    Toby C. Campbell, MD, MSCI, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center

    Panelists 
    Maria Dans, MD, Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine
    Sophia Smith, PhD, MSW, Duke Cancer Institute
    Carri Siedlik, APRN, ACHPNFred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center

 

6.  New NCCN Guidelines

  • Session: 
    New NCCN Guidelines for Vulvar Cancer
    Friday, April 1, 2016, 3:45–4:45 pm
  • Speakers:
    Benjamin E. Greer, MD, and Wui-Jin Koh, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/
    Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

 

7. Updated NCCN Guidelines for the treatment of the following cancer types:

  • Melanoma
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • EGFR-positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers, is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The primary goal of all NCCN initiatives is to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of oncology practice so patients can live better lives. For more information, visit NCCN.org.

The NCCN Member Institutions are:

  • Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center
  • Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute
  • City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
  • Duke Cancer Institute
  • Fox Chase Cancer Center
  • Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah
  • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
  • The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins
  • Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • Mayo Clinic Cancer Center
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Moffitt Cancer Center
  • The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute
  • Roswell Park Cancer Institute
  • Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine
  • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center
  • Stanford Cancer Institute
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center
  • UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • University of Colorado Cancer Center
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center
  • Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
  • Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital