NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

51 NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® : Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, 2018 Dictionary intolerance When treatment with a drug must be stopped due to severe side effects. liver An organ that removes waste from the blood and helps to digest food. log reduction A decrease in the number of cells that have the BCR-ABL1 gene. lymphocyte A type of white blood cell that helps protect the body from infection and disease. lymphoid Referring to a type of white blood cell called a lymphocyte. major molecular response (MMR) An improvement related to treatment, when tests detect a 3-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 levels. It means that there are 1,000 times fewer cells with the BCR-ABL1 gene than the standardized baseline level. medical history All health events and medications taken to date. molecular response An improvement related to treatment, when tests detect a decrease in the number of cells that have the BCR-ABL1 gene. mutation An abnormal change in the coded instructions in cells for making and controlling cells. mutation testing A test that looks for abnormal changes in genes (the coded instructions in cells for making and controlling cells). myeloid Referring to a type of white blood cell called a granulocyte. neutrophil A type of white blood cell that helps fight infections and has small particles (granules). pathologist A doctor who’s an expert in testing cells and tissue to find disease. Philadelphia chromosome An abnormal, short chromosome 22 that is formed when parts of chromosomes 9 and 22 switch with each other. It is the hallmark of chronic myelogenous leukemia and contains the BCR-ABL1 gene. physical exam A review of the body by a health expert for signs of disease. prognosis The likely or expected course and outcome of a disease. quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) A very sensitive test that measures the number of cells in the blood or bone marrow that have the BCR-ABL1 gene. relapse The return or worsening of cancer after a period of improvement. remission There are minor or no signs of a disease. resistance When cancer does not respond to a drug treatment. risk group Grouping of patients who will likely have a similar treatment outcome. secondary resistance When cancer responds to a drug at first, but then stops responding after a period of time. second-line treatment The next treatment used against a disease after the first treatment failed or had to be stopped. sedative A drug that helps a person to relax or go to sleep. side effect An unhealthy or unpleasant physical or emotional condition caused by treatment. spleen An organ to the left of the stomach that helps protect the body from disease. steroid A drug used to reduce swelling, pain, and redness.

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