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49

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 1.2015

Chart 4.4

lists the treatment options for cancer that

has relapsed. Before treatment is started, a biopsy

is needed to confirm relapse. Treatment options in

the chart are grouped by cancer stage and prior

treatment. For any relapse, treatment options include

the following cancer drugs:

C-MOPP

(cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine,

prednisone),

DHAP

(dexamethasone, cisplatin, high-dose

cytarabine),

ESHAP

(etoposide, methylprednisolone, high-dose

cytarabine and cisplatin),

GCD

(gemcitabine, carboplatin, dexamethasone),

GVD

(gemcitabine, vinorelbine, liposomal

doxorubicin),

ICE

(ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide),

GEV

(ifosfamide, gemcitabine, vinorelbine),

Mini-BEAM

(carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide,

melphalan),

MINE

(etoposide, ifosfamide, mesna, mitoxantrone),

and

Brentuximab vedotin.

A stem cell transplant, radiation therapy, or both

may be added to drug treatment if stage IA or IIA

with no prior radiation therapy. Some people with

these cancers may have a second option of radiation

therapy alone.

If you’ll receive a transplant, do not take

chemotherapy with mechlorethamine, procarbazine,

carmustine, or melphalan. These drugs may

result in a poor collection of stem cells. With the

transplant, you may receive radiation therapy if not

received before. TLI (

t

otal

l

ymphoid

i

rradiation) is

radiation given to all lymphatic tissue. It is used with

chemotherapy to kill cancer cells so that the stem cell

transplant is more likely to cure the cancer.

4

Treatment guide: Classical Hodgkin lymphoma Treatment for cancer relapse