NCCN Guidelines for Patients® | Melanoma

88 NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® : Melanoma, 2018 Dictionary long-term side effect An unplanned or unwanted physical or emotional response to treatment that continues for months or years after finishing treatment. lymph A clear fluid containing white blood cells that fight infection and disease. lymphedema Swelling due to buildup of a clear fluid containing white blood cells (lymph). lymph node Small groups of special disease-fighting cells located throughout the body. lymph node biopsy Removal of all or part of a lymph node (groups of special disease-fighting cells located throughout the body) to test for disease. lymph node dissection Surgery to remove some or all lymph nodes (groups of special disease-fighting cells) from the area near the tumor. lymph node recurrence Cancer that has come back after treatment and has spread to lymph nodes (groups of special disease-fighting cells). lymph vessels Tubes that carry lymph—a clear fluid containing white blood cells that fight disease and infection—throughout the body and connect lymph nodes to one another. Also called lymphatic channels. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan A test that uses radio waves and powerful magnets to make pictures of the inside of the body showing the shape and function of body parts. medical history All health events and medications taken to date. medical skin exam A careful examination of your skin by a doctor to check for any areas that look abnormal. melanin A substance that gives color to the skin. melanocytes Cells that are located in the lower part of the top layer of the skin (epidermis) and make a substance that gives skin its color. melanoma Cancer that starts in melanocytes—cells that give skin its color and are located in the top layer of the skin (epidermis). melanoma in situ Cancer cells are only in the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). metastases Tumors formed by cancer cells that have spread from the first tumor to other parts of the body. metastasis The spread of cancer cells from the first tumor to another body part. metastatic Containing cancer cells that have spread from the first tumor. microsatellitosis Tiny tumors (satellites) that have spread to skin near the first melanoma tumor and can only be seen with a microscope. microscope A tool that uses lenses to see things the eyes can’t. microscopic Something so small it can’t be seen by the naked eye. mole A spot on the skin formed by a cluster of cells that make melanin (substance that gives skin its color). monoclonal antibody A type of immune system protein made in a lab that can attach to substances in the body such as cancer cells. negative margins There are no cancer cells in the normal-looking tissue around the edge of the tumor removed during surgery. neoadjuvant treatment Treatment given before the main or primary treatment. neurotropism Melanoma cells are able to grow into (invade) nerves.

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