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38

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

:

Ovarian Cancer, Version 1.2017

4

Cancer treatments

Chemotherapy

Some platinum agents used for ovarian cancer are

carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin.

Taxanes block certain cell parts to stop a cell

from dividing into two cells. Some taxanes used

for ovarian cancer are paclitaxel, paclitaxel

albumin-bound, and docetaxel.

Guide 2

lists the

chemotherapy drugs that are used for ovarian

cancer.

Guide 2. Chemotherapy drugs

Generic name

Brand name (sold as)

Altretamine

Hexalen

®

Capecitabine

Xeloda

®

Carboplatin

--

Cisplatin

Platinol

®

Cyclophosphamide

--

Docetaxel

Taxotere

®

Doxorubicin

Adriamycin

®

Doxorubicin, liposome

injection

Doxil

®

Etoposide, oral

--

Gemcitabine

Gemzar

®

Ifosfamide

--

Irinotecan

Camptosar

®

Melphalan

Alkeran

®

Oxaliplatin

Eloxatin

®

Paclitaxel

Taxol

®

Paclitaxel, albumin-

bound

Abraxane

®

Pemetrexed

Alimta

®

Topotecan

Hycamtin

®

Vinorelbine

Navelbine

Because chemotherapy drugs differ in how

they work, more than one drug is often used. A

combination regimen is the use of two or more

drugs. When only one drug is used, it is called a

single agent. A regimen is a treatment plan that

specifies the drug(s), dose, schedule, and length

of treatment. The most common regimens used for

initial chemotherapy treatment are:

†

†

Paclitaxel and carboplatin

†

†

Paclitaxel and carboplatin (weekly)

†

†

Dose-dense paclitaxel and carboplatin

†

†

Paclitaxel and cisplatin

†

†

Docetaxel and carboplatin

Chemotherapy is given in cycles. A cycle includes

days of treatment followed by days of rest. Giving

chemotherapy in cycles lets the body have a chance

to recover before the next treatment. The cycles

vary in length depending on which drugs are used.

Often, the cycles are 7, 14, 21, or 28 days long. The

number of treatment days per cycle and the number

of cycles given also varies depending on the regimen

used.

How chemotherapy is given

Most of the chemotherapy drugs for ovarian cancer

are liquids that are slowly injected into a vein. This

is called an IV (

i

ntra

v

enous) infusion. Some drugs,

such as etoposide and altretamine, are pills that are

swallowed.

Chemotherapy can also be given as a liquid that is

slowly injected into the abdomen (peritoneal cavity).

This is called IP (

i

ntra

p

eritoneal) chemotherapy.

When given this way, higher doses of the drugs are

delivered directly to the cancer cells in the belly area.