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47

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

:

Ovarian Cancer, Version 1.2017

5

Treatment guide

Stage I ovarian cancer

Guide 4. Primary treatment for ovarian cancer confirmed by prior surgery or

biopsy

Results of prior surgery or biopsy

Primary treatment options

Surgery and staging complete

ª

• No more surgery needed

Likely stage IA or IB, grade 1

Cancer is in one or both ovaries only and it is low

grade (slow-growing)

ª

• Surgical staging

Likely stage IA or IB, grade 2

Cancer is in one or both ovaries only and it is

medium grade

ª

ª

ª

If doctor considers observation

• Surgical staging

If doctors think no cancer remains

• Surgical staging

• Completion surgery and surgical staging

• No more surgery, start chemotherapy (6

cycles)

If doctors think some cancer remains

• Completion surgery and surgical staging

Likely stage IA or IB, grade 3 or clear cell, or

stage IC

Cancer is in one or both ovaries only, and it’s

high grade (fast-growing), or cancer is also on the

ovary surface, the ovary capsule has ruptured,

and/or cancer cells are in ascites or washings

ª

ª

If doctors think no cancer remains

• Completion surgery and surgical staging

• No more surgery, start chemotherapy (6

cycles)

If doctors think some cancer remains

• Completion surgery and surgical staging

Guide 4

shows the primary treatment options for

stage I ovarian cancer that was confirmed by a prior

surgery or biopsy. Stage I ovarian cancer is when

cancer is only in the ovaries and has not spread to

other tissues or organs. Primary treatment is the

main treatment used to rid the body of cancer.

Surgery is often used as primary treatment for

stage I ovarian cancer. But, there is more than one

option and more than one type of surgery to choose

from. Which option is best for you depends on a few

key factors.

The main factor is whether or not the prior surgery

and staging were complete. Surgical staging is

considered complete if the prior surgery removed all

of the cancer, both ovaries, both fallopian tubes, the

uterus, nearby supporting tissues, the omentum, and

nearby lymph nodes.

The cancer stage and cancer grade are also

important. The cancer stage describes how far the

cancer has grown and spread. The cancer grade

describes how fast the cancer will likely grow based

on how much the cancer cells look like normal cells.