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2.2 Stages II and III sarcoma

Treatment options for sarcoma are based on whether

surgery can be done. Some sarcomas can’t be

removed by surgery at first because they are too

large. Removing some sarcomas would limit use of

your limb or other body part. Surgery may also not be

an option because of your health. Treatment options

for when surgery can be done are listed next followed

by options when surgery may not be possible.

Chart 2.2.1

maps the treatment options for stage II

and III sarcomas that can be treated with surgery. For

stage IIA, surgery alone may be an option. Surgery

alone may be done if the tumor is small and the

surgical margins can be wide.

The second option for stage IIA is surgery followed

by radiation therapy. You should receive radiation

if cancer is found close to or at the margins and a

second surgery can’t be done.

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 1.2014

20

2

Sarcomas in limbs, outer trunk, head, or neck Stages II and III sarcoma

Chart 2.2.1 Surgery is an option

Stage

Neoadjuvant treatment

Primary treatment

Adjuvant treatment

IIA

Surgery

Surgery

Surgery

Radiation therapy

Consider radiation boost

Radiation therapy

IIB or

III

Surgery

Surgery

Surgery

Surgery

Radiation therapy, or

Radiation therapy +

chemotherapy

Radiation therapy boost ±

chemotherapy

Radiation therapy, or

Radiation therapy +

chemotherapy

Radiation therapy

Chemoradiation

Chemotherapy