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3.2 Treatment without surgery

Chart 3.2

maps the treatment options for sarcomas

that can’t be treated with surgery. However, other

treatments may shrink the tumor so that surgery

can be done. These treatments include radiation

therapy, chemotherapy, or both. Radiation may be

given if the area was never treated with it before. If

after these treatments you are able to have surgery,

read

Treatment with surgery

on page 34

for more

information.

If you are unable to have surgery, palliative care is an

option. Palliative care is also called supportive care.

It does not try to cure the cancer but aims to control

symptoms.

Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery may

stop or decrease tumor growth. Other supportive care

is available depending on your symptoms. If you have

no symptoms, observation is an option. Your doctor

may also suggest surgery to remove metastatic

tumors.

Joining a clinical trial is highly encouraged. You’ll

likely receive the best management of care. Ask your

treatment team if there are clinical trials you can join.

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 1.2014

36

3

Sarcomas in the inner trunk

Treatment without surgery | Review

Chart 3.2 Treatment options

Neoadjuvant treatment

Primary treatment

Palliative care

Review

• Treatment planning is an important first step of care.

• Sarcomas in the inner trunk may or may not be

treated with surgery.

Surgery

Unable to have surgery

Radiation therapy,

Chemotherapy, or

Both

None

Chemotherapy,

Radiation,

Surgery of primary tumor,

Supportive care,

Observation if no symptoms, or

Consider surgery of metastases