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7

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Breast Cancer - Carcinoma in Situ

(stage 0)

, Version 1.2016

1

Carcinoma in situ

The 3 types

The 3 types

Carcinoma in situ is a confusing term. “Carcinoma”

is a type of cancer that starts in cells that make up

the skin or tissue that lines or covers organs. “In situ”

means that no abnormal cells have grown into the

stroma. However, not all carcinoma in situ is cancer.

Lobular carcinoma in situ

Although called a carcinoma, LCIS (

l

obular

c

arcinoma

i

n

s

itu) isn’t cancer. It is an abnormal cell

growth within the lobules. However, having had LCIS

increases your chances for breast cancer.

Ductal carcinoma in situ

DCIS (

d

uctal

c

arcinoma

i

n

s

itu) is breast cancer. It

is a carcinoma that started in ductal cells and hasn’t

grown outside the breast ducts. If left untreated, DCIS

could grow outside of the ducts and spread beyond

the breast.

Paget's disease of the breast

Paget's disease of the breast is breast cancer. It is a

carcinoma involving the nipple. It is a very rare form

of breast cancer and isn't addressed in this book.

Figure 1.1 Inside women’s breasts

Inside of women’s breasts are millions of lobules that form breast milk after a baby is born.

Breast milk drains from the lobules into ducts that carry the milk to the nipple. Around the

lobules and ducts is soft tissue called stroma.

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