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30

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Breast Cancer - Early-Stage

(STAGES I AND II)

, Version 1.2016

3

Breast cancer surgery

Breast tumor surgery

Chart 3.1 Treatment options

Types of surgery

Deciding factors

Lumpectomy followed

by radiation therapy

(AKA

breast-conserving therapy) is

an option if

all

of these factors

describe you

Ü

• Haven’t had radiation close to where the cancer is,

• Can have all cancer removed through one cut,

• Have no health conditions that might cause problems,

• Don’t have a genetic risk for breast cancer,

• Have cancer-free surgical margins, and

• Your breast won’t be too disfigured afterward.

Lumpectomy followed

by radiation therapy

(AKA

breast-conserving therapy) may

be an option if

any

of these

factors describe you

Ü

• Have had prior radiation close to where the cancer is,

• Have a breast tumor larger than 5 cm,

• Are pregnant,

• Have a connective tissue disease that affects your skin,

• Have a genetic risk for breast cancer, or

• Have a surgical margin with a limited area of cancer.

Total mastectomy

is an

option if

all

of these factors

describe you

Ü

• Are unable or refuse to have an lumpectomy, and

• Are healthy enough for surgery

Breast tumor surgery

Chart 3.1

lists deciding factors so you can know

which breast surgery is an option for you. As shown in

Figure 3.1

, there are two types of breast surgery for

stages I and II breast cancer. They are lumpectomy

and total mastectomy. Other treatments may be used

with breast surgery to rid your body of cancer.

Lumpectomy

A lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy is called

breast-conserving therapy. It is an option for many

but not all women with stage I or II breast cancer. The

goal of a lumpectomy is to remove all the cancer in

the breast while sparing healthy breast tissue. The

deciding factors listed in the chart exclude women for