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46

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

:

Breast Cancer – Locally Advanced (STAGE III)

Version 1.2017

Clinical stage IIIA (T3, N1, M0)

Guide 7

lists radiation options for cancers rated T3,

N1, M0 at diagnosis. Most women with this cancer

stage receive radiation therapy. Options are based

on the type of breast surgery received, lymph node

status, and overall cancer stage.

After lumpectomy, radiation to your whole breast

is advised. If N1, radiation to nearby lymph nodes

may be strongly considered. If N2 or N3, radiation to

nearby nodes is advised. Toward the end of radiation,

you may receive extra radiation where the breast

tumor was. This extra radiation is called a boost.

After mastectomy, almost all women will receive

radiation. If N1, radiation should be strongly

considered. If N2 or N3, radiation to the chest wall

and nearby lymph nodes is advised. A boost to the

surgical scar may be added.

Residual disease

If you had chemotherapy, there are other times

when radiation should be received. These conditions

include 1) high T or N clinical scores, 2) large

residual cancer in the breast, and 3) any residual

cancer in lymph nodes. Residual cancer is cancer

that remains after treatment.

Clinical stage IIIA (T0–T3, N2, M0), IIIB, IIIC

Guide 8

lists radiation options for all other stage III

cancers. There is a higher chance that the cancer

will return. Thus, radiation is advised for all these

cancers.

After lumpectomy, radiation to your whole breast is

advised. Nearby lymph nodes will be treated, too.

Toward the end of treatment, you may receive extra

radiation where the breast tumor was. This is called

a boost.

After mastectomy, radiation to the chest wall and

nearby lymph nodes is advised. Toward the end of

radiation, you may receive

a radiation boost to the

surgical scar.

5

Radiation therapy

Treatment guide