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16

17

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Stomach Cancer, Version 1.2016

NCCN Guidelines for Patients

®

Stomach Cancer, Version 1.2016

2

Cancer staging

The 5 stages

Chart 1. Stomach cancer stages

ANATOMIC STAGE/PROGNOSTIC GROUPS

Stage 0

Tis

N0

M0

Stage IA

T1

N0

M0

Stage IB

T2

N0

M0

T1

N1

M0

Stage IIA

T3

N0

M0

T2

N1

M0

T1

N2

M0

Stage IIB

T4a

N0

M0

T3

N1

M0

T2

N2

M0

T1

N3

M0

Stage IIIA

T4a

N1

M0

T3

N2

M0

T2

N3

M0

Stage IIIB

T4b

N0

M0

T4b

N1

M0

T4a

N2

M0

T3

N3

M0

Stage IIIC

T4b

N2

M0

T4b

N3

M0

T4a

N3

M0

Stage IV

Any T

Any N

M1

Used with the permission of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), Chicago, Illinois. The original

source for this material is the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, Seventh Edition (2010), published by Springer

Science+Business Media, LLC,

www.springer.com

.

2

Cancer staging

The 5 stages

The 5 stages

Chart 1

shows the staging groups labeled by Roman

numerals 0–IV. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in

situ. The stages are defined by the TNM scores.

In general, earlier cancer stages have better

outcomes. However, doctors define cancer stages with

information from thousands of patients, so a cancer

stage gives an average outcome. It may not tell the

outcome for one person. Some people will do better

than expected. Others will do worse. Other factors not

used for staging cancer, such as your general health,

are also very important.

Cancer is often staged twice. The first rating is done

before treatment and is called the clinical (or baseline)

stage. The second rating is done after treatment, such

as surgery, and is called the pathologic stage.